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Joseph Kronheim

Joseph Martin Kronheim was born in Magdeburg, Germany on 26th October 1810. He moved to Edinburgh, via Paris, when he was 22 before becoming established at 32 Paternoster Row, London around 1846.

In 1850, Kronheim acquired a license to operate the Baxter process. Kronheim found the Baxter process very time consuming and adapted the process, using zinc blocks instead of wood blocks. This, however, resulted in a flatter finish. He then turned to lithography for a short time, but soon returned to printing by the Baxter process. Oscar Frauenknecht acquired a stake in the business in 1852 and it is said that the firm had produced over 1000 different subjects using the Baxter process by 1854. They also produced a great number of prints for the Paris Exhibition in 1855 and at the end of the exhibition Kronheim sold his share of the business to Frauenknecht and retired to Germany.

Kronheim's retirement did not last long and he was soon to be found trying to set up a printing business in America. These exploits were also short lived, and he rejoined Frauenknecht and his old firm, Kronheim & Co. in London, although this time, not as a partner. The firm continued to expand, opening offices in Manchester and Glasgow.  In 1875 the firm stopped using the Baxter process, having installed steam litho machines. Kronheim retired again in 1887 and died in Berlin in 1896 aged 85.

More about Joseph Kronheim.

For more about Kronheim & Co and their prints check out the following monthly features:

April 2017 - Print of the Month - Kings and Queens of England III
August 2016 - Print of the Month - Prebischer Thor
February 2016 - Article - The Death of Rev John Williams
January 2016 - Article - Kronheim Playing Cards
October 2015 - Print of the Month - The Dog Begging
March 2015 - Print of the Month - Esmeralda
August 2014 - Print of the Month - Llandaff Cathedral
January 2014 - Print of the Month - New Year's Gifts
November 2013 - Print of the Month - Les Albaniens
April 2013 - Article - The Aunt Louisa books published by Frederick Warne & Co.
April 2013 - Print of the Month - Constantinople
December 2012 - Article - Kronheim & Co. in the USA
October 2012 - Article - The New Hall Vault Sale
September 2012 - Print of the Month - The Village Schoolmaster